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#30348 - 06/06/09 12:19 AM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: butephoto]
Jolly Toper Offline
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Registered: 18/01/08
Posts: 553
Loc: East Calder, West Lothian, Sco...
Here we go again. This tasting was not a sell-out with 15 people attending, myself and 4 'carry-outs'. As Butephoto said over at whiskywhiskywhisky there was a nice mix of regulars and visitors. Its particularly satisfying to have overseas whisky appreciators take the chance and try these tastings out. Some Australians two different representatives from Germany and a Dutchman were able to enjoy the company of die-hards who rarely miss a tasting and others who come now and again.

The habit has become switching between a themed tasting and a standard mix. Last night saw the template of something old, rare, unusual, sherried and peaty with a mystery. As the tasting wasn't full the remnants were auctioned off with any proceeds going to Worldvision sponsor a child. Foolishly in all the excitement I forgot to hold back a dram for the write up. Perhaps those Forum members who got a bottle could add their notes?

First up was the newly released first general offering of Kilkerran from Mitchell's Glengyle distillery. No age statement but 2000 cases of 6 bottles as a work-in-progress a la Ardbeg. 46% abv. Circa 30. To date my experience of this malt has been positive with perhaps a more active cask helping the young spirit along. Previoos bottlings have been at cask strength so this pre-diluted example seemed to have the brakes on a bit. Also a mix of wood types allowed the spirit to come to the fore more than earlier examples. The tell tale Campbeltown body wasn't so obvious but a salinity was noted by some. The malt used for Kilkerran (the actual name of the distillery can't be used to describe the brand as it is owned by another company hence the use of a old title for the area) is identical to that used for Springbank so is hand malted in Campbeltown to 8ppm (I believe this is the correct measurement of phenols). If you don't know the story of this distillery I recommend you find out the details. Essentially the Mitchell dynasty built the still but it closed in 1929. Looking to re-open a closed distillery the present patriach of the family company found the buildings at Glen Gyle to be structurally sound. Subsequently ahead of schedule the plant came back to life in 2004. Some second hand equipment contributed to the refit with the two stills, one partially modified, coming from Ben Wyvis from within the Invergordon grain complex. Frank McHardy production director oversaw the rebuilding of the distillery and must have found it poetic that these stills were used as he started his career in the mid-60s at Invergordon. The gentle nature of the dram may be more typical of the make than previous examples, visitors to the distillery get access to a cask from which bottles may be filled, but subtle tones were commented on. A fair point to start at with a modest score of 46% led to some dissappointment from me personally. Although I am far from an employee of the Mitchells I would be pleased to be thought of as having an association with the companmy through close working relationships so I felt such an exciting release should have made a bigger splash than it would appear. I'll have to try it again, and again,...There was no convincing pattern to the scoring with a clutch of 6-out-of-9 being the highest. The Gay Gordons, straight forward fun. 'Sade- Smooth Operator''the Bairn' 'like a swallow' 'lean'

Next was a real treat for the trainspotters. The uber rare Glenisla bottled by Signatory. I understand only two casks of this malt have ever been bottled, both hogsheads from 1977. This at 28yo and 48.6%. A snapped up a bottle and one of the Craigduffs when they came out 3 years ago and can't believe some of this stuff is still available retail. At about 130 this is a bargain for rarity baggers. For me this only existed as the occassional mention in books like Walter Schobbert's. The story of these experimental Chivas distilates is pleasingly still unclear as the bottler had to amend an initial statement as to their prevenance. Glen Keith was credited with the production of Glenisla and Strathisla with Craigduff. Can anybody confirm the real story? Apparently peaty water was shipped all the way from Lewis for production and I think a swivelling lyne arm was also fiddled with. The result here is quite peculiar but not in a bad way. My father is a keen photographer and I can't get away from something in the nose reminding me strongly of leather Pentax camera cases or binocular cases. The sweetish nose and palate were easy access and a twisty tangled web of character was very engaging. 55% saw scores ranging from from 1 consisently up to 8. I admit surprise at the cool reception for the Glengyle but included it anyway for its newness and it's significance, the Glenisla warranted trying thanks to its rarity and I was happily surprised at the warm response it got from many present. The Canadian Barn Dance- a bit more involved. 'Goofy' 'an ostrich' 'Horrace Broon'

Next was Bladnoch Forum Invergordon grain 19.12.72 - 06.04.09 36yo 41.6%. Bargain. Infact irresponsibly cheap. Keep up the excellent work Raymond just don't open a shop at 170 Canongate, Edinburgh. By now we've tried a fair few top quality grains and this just underlines the world class spirit that this stuff can be. Nothing short of sublime. Another cask was bottled at this time and if a gun was to my head this was the better. However I think more research is required as I only had them side by side once so far. Damned wallet isn't as accomodating as it needs to be this stuff should be bought by the case. The connection between Glen Gyle, Frank and this tasting gets stronger with this dram, serendipity indeed. a resounding 78% with no low scores and two full marks recorded. 'Maggie Broon', 'Nureyev' 'wagtail: chirpy, bouncy and makes you smile' strip-the-willow: sociable and good fun, 'dreamlike'

Courtesy of Butephoto the mystery was a guessing game for me too for a change. I had had a couple of contenders for the spot and had gone over budget with the tasting so Mark's generosity solved 2 problems. I bought the bottle in the auction and at 9.99 a bottle the wallet didn't fall out with me. This was Aldi's Bourbon 'Clarke's' 40% Kentucky. After a recent American whisky tasting with Willy and others then whiskywhiskywhisky's on-line grain tasting I came to 2 conclusions. Only 2 or 3 of this style of dram will do of an evening and Bourbon is nearly always of a more than acceptable quality but my palate is too inexperienced to differentiate the greats from the fines. I believe this Bourbon to be young and lacking in body but it still delivers the Bourbon promise of big flavours, seewtness and a certain spicy finish. Bargain but not so popular with the committee. 26% of possible score. Kentucky's got talent. The can-can, 'Hen Broon', 'needs mixer' 'parrot- tropical overtones'.

Penultimate was an old favourite. I seldom use the same dram twice at the Canongate. Exceptions are due to quality. When Graham from John, Scott and Millar in Orkney kindly contacted me to remind me I had a bottle of this stuff still waiting for me (the last they had I beleive) I couldn't believe my luck! Their ancient Highland Park bottlings have become mythical and I think the final most prehistoric one is about to be unleashed. This example was of some quarter sherry casks from the 60s mixed with one cask of Invergordon (this is getting eerie) to bring the strength up to 43% and make it bottle-able. Like the next dram when taken alone the effect is overwhelming but in an ascending line up of intensity the result is awesome. I found it very difficult to auction off the Invergordon and this bottling as I'd love to keep/share something so special but needs must. When originally tasted I remember picking out the grain from the sherry clearly as did some at the tasting but last night I didn't get that effect. A gift of 10cl to a Malt Maniac, Canadian Lawrence, resulted in the desired effect. 76% again 2 full scores. The eightsome real- serious stuff, complex and hard work but a thing of wonder. 'rock 'n' roll' 'Maw Broon's Christmas cake' 'an emu' 'a gateaux'.

Finally another no-brainer for inclusion Ardbeg Supernova Megapeat 58.9%. As said earlier a bit too big a bite to chew properly unless you've battered your palate into submission. Then like the Red Cross you give mouth to mouth to your poor old tastebuds with a beauty of a beast. But whats with the price? Are Ardbeg and Bruichladdich fighting a financial war as well as a peat arms race? Who cares if they keep coming up with the goods? We'll buy it by the dram or the bottle if we can afford it and not if we can't. We make the market and others exploit it. Thumbs up with 76% and only 2 individuals obviously showing a lack of love for the Islay style. 3 full scores, quite a rare achievement. 'Joe Broon' 'powerhouse' 'surprisingly unaggressive''oasis' 'an osprey- a bit Grrr but not as hard as an eagle'.

Something this fun can't be good for you.

Next tasting:- Springbank comparison- the official 10yo 100 proof up against 4 independently bottled examples and a red herring. So far The Whisky Shop 15yo, probably a SMWS, a Whisky Exchange example maybe a Cadenheads and possibly a Lombard. June 18th 20/17. Check http://www.jollytopertastings.co.uk for updates. (I thought I'd tell you the actual address rather than the wrong one like in the last post)

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#30352 - 06/06/09 10:45 AM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: Jolly Toper]
Willie JJ Offline
Full Member


Registered: 21/11/07
Posts: 634
Loc: Midlothian, Scotland
 Originally Posted By: Jolly Toper
Something this fun can't be good for you.

Rubbish, its just what the doctor ordered.

 Originally Posted By: Jolly Toper
Next tasting:- Springbank comparison- ... and possibly a Lombard

Do you mean the Lombard I recently bought? \:\)
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Willie

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#30354 - 06/06/09 10:47 AM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: Willie JJ]
butephoto Offline
Full Member


Registered: 14/02/08
Posts: 106
Loc: Glasgow, Scotland
Ye cannae beat the Broons.
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www.whiskywhiskywhisky.com

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#30371 - 06/06/09 07:43 PM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: butephoto]
Jolly Toper Offline
Full Member


Registered: 18/01/08
Posts: 553
Loc: East Calder, West Lothian, Sco...
Willy your doctoe orders you to drink whisky? Does the NHS pay? Hmm. And no the Lombard is a 1991 - 2003.

Mark I've got an original of a Broons story where Paw and Granpaw buy from Cadenheads - priceless!! Another has their Gordon and MacPhail bottles go in the bin, snigger.

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#30375 - 06/06/09 10:39 PM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: Jolly Toper]
butephoto Offline
Full Member


Registered: 14/02/08
Posts: 106
Loc: Glasgow, Scotland
Is it this one?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Broons-Day-Oot-Broon-Family/dp/toc/1902407946
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www.whiskywhiskywhisky.com

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#30376 - 07/06/09 06:55 AM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: butephoto]
Jolly Toper Offline
Full Member


Registered: 18/01/08
Posts: 553
Loc: East Calder, West Lothian, Sco...
I've not seen this, how exciting! We've a blown up copy of the one I'm taliking about in the shop.
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#30382 - 07/06/09 08:56 PM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: Jolly Toper]
TheTross Offline
Member


Registered: 02/04/08
Posts: 1
Loc: Oldham, England
Hi everyone!

Id like to apologise to all and sundry for the late notes that Ive posted below for the 23/04 tasting. I aimed to take part in that tasting on the day, but I was late contacting Mark about the minis. Coupled with a holiday that I went on soon after for a fortnight, and a couple of other things that have happened since then, has meant me only getting round to trying the samples this afternoon/evening. However, I promised Mark that I would share my findings here with you all, so here they are!


1. Cadenheads Pulteney 18yo 1990/2009 (57.2%, 217 bottles)

Nose: Sweet and honeyed, with a layer of chocolate orange appearing after time in the glass. Some soft notes of vanilla, malt and biscuits. Perhaps a hint of draff? Something winy. A little citrussy.

Palate: Lots of honey again. Quite fizzy. A winy hit appears after a few seconds, with a malty, almost yeasty top note. Quite drying.

Finish: Honeyed, with gentle wine. A long-lasting subtle grassiness at the end, with the wine making sporadic reappearances.


Allowing this to spend some time in the glass lets it take on a beautiful chocolate orange character that integrates well with the overall honeyed profile. I found it quite difficult to detect much on the palate though, and for me the finish is largely based on a recurring theme of honey, wine and grass. I certainly couldn't get anything coastal, which is what I'd have expected. Pretty decent all in all, but not one I'd buy.


2. Springbank 18yo 46%

Nose: Lots of sherry. Ground chocolate, toffee and dark treacle. Lightly briny, salty and herby. Maybe a light earthiness. Traces of mint. Quite creamy and buttery. Hints of leather and wet dog?

Palate: Sherry again, but it's more winy than it was on the nose. Some leathery notes and dark chocolate. Brine and salt again, more so than on the nose.

Finish: Quite winy, with a little mint and some treacle coming through after a few seconds. Fairly flat.


A stunning nose let down, I feel, by a slightly thin palate and short, flat finish, although both of these are still pretty good. Very drinkable and easy-going.


3. Bunnahabhain Darach Ur (46.3%, OB)

Nose: Slightly rubbery at first, but that almost completely disappears within a matter of minutes. Vanilla and dark toffee. A faint trace of wood (sawdust). Possibly some plummy new-make notes in the background.

Palate: Slightly fizzy. Some oak and oaky spiciness. Quite creamy, with possibly a little chocolate developing.

Finish: Quite honeyed and slightly mentholated. An oaky dryness.


I'm not sure what to make of this really. The nose is pretty good, but I struggled with both the palate and finish; they seemed a little wishy-washy to me and lacking any real character.


4. Karuizawa 1972/2008 (65.0%, OB, cask #7290, 529 bottles)

Nose: Immediate sherry. Marzipan, baklavas, dark treacle toffee. Possibly a hint of smoke. Light wood. Quite fruity. Very soft peatiness?

Palate: Sherried again. Hot! Sweet, with more notes of marzipan and treacle, but also a little earthiness.

Finish: Powerful! Unsurprisingly, lots of sherry. A little mentholated (due to the alcohol level?). A little fruit. Touches of sulphur later on. Leaves a dry coating on the cheeks.


What a beautiful nose! I suspect the palate and finish are excellent too, but regretfully - and, perhaps, stupidly - I didn't add water. Still very good when neat, but the heat is overpowering.


5. Spinnaker single cask (50.1%)

Nose: Pencil, pencil shavings, plasticine/putty. There's something chemical about this too, but I can't put my finger on it. Also something like burnt caramel.

Palate: Like liquified wood with burnt caramel mixed in. Nothing more, nothing less for me I'm afraid. A nice thick, oily mouthfeel though.

Finish: Softer oak, with something burnt alongside and possibly a little soap. Maybe a little liquorice/aniseed late on.


This is bizarre whisky and, to be honest, not good as far as I'm concerned. In fact, it's one of only two whiskies that I've screwed my face up at. Can't find anything good to say about this one at all I'm afraid.


6. Cadenheads Bowmore 11yo 1997/2009 (57.9%, 295 bottles)

Nose: Peaty and briny. Notes of salted fish. Wet, moss-covered stone. Perhaps a suggestion of iodine. Manure. Quite smoky. A little oaky, with a hint of caramel in the background.

Palate: Peat is immediately apparent again, but gentler than the nose promises. Salty and a little briny. Honeyed notes? Quite sweet after a short while in the mouth. Very warming.

Finish: Pretty sweet overall. Salty and quite well peated, with a briny, faintly peppery aftertaste. A little lavender crops up right at the death.


I'm not generally a fan of Bowmore, but this bottling is up there with the better ones I've had; I can't detect any of that blasted perfume or lavender in this, except for right at the death of the finish (I can live with that!). Actually reminds me of Port Charlotte in some ways...


A very interesting tasting! Of the six, my favourite has to be the Karuizawa - I'm a real softy for heavily-sherried drams! Second spot is a tie between the Springbank and the Bowmore.

And my least favourite? Er, the Spinnaker. Good to try whisky from other countries though, and I never expected I'd get the chance to try a German single malt, so thanks Mark!

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#30383 - 07/06/09 10:16 PM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: TheTross]
Jolly Toper Offline
Full Member


Registered: 18/01/08
Posts: 553
Loc: East Calder, West Lothian, Sco...
Great notes Tross. Indeed the Spinnaker was a way out 'left field' as some say. I'll add that the mystery dram is quite often something included as it adds little if anything to the budget and is a 'bonus' used fot curiosity value. Also for me the jury is still out on the Darrach Ur for me too. Cheers
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#30698 - 20/06/09 12:44 AM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: Jolly Toper]
Jolly Toper Offline
Full Member


Registered: 18/01/08
Posts: 553
Loc: East Calder, West Lothian, Sco...
Springbank comparison. The latest in a series of tastings where the distiller's own effort at a full srength consistent brand is put up against 4 independently bottled examples and a red herring. The idea is to test the independents for quality and value against the hopeful guarantee of quality and consistency of the makers themselves. 24 tasters were present with the remainder of the 28 drams being posted. 18 of those present fed back their thoughts.

First was the Scotch Malt Whisky Society 27.72 05/96 12yo refill hogshead 292 bottles. As Yogi noted the liquid wass markedly cold in the glass others found the nose was nippy with a fair sting on the palate. Not young by any measure but at just over 100 proof the alcohol was evident. The subdued nose followed through on the palate with little being given away at full strength. A finish of sweetness and sticky caramel lingered a fair while. With water a more organic element was apparent, perhaps Polo mints but still a gentle example. The palate was much more approachable with several comments of the coastal/briny aspect the distillery is known for. SB is a dram I'm pretty familiar with and this rates as one of the most pedestrian examples I've tried. Nothing wrong with that but others may have expected a bit more from the curtain raiser. Although having the lightest one first is almost a rule. Peat was non-existant and it would have been very difficult to pin point this one blind. Indeed some thought we started with the dummy. I'd be happy to sell this but wouldn't have many reasons to bring people's attention to it. However on the zero to nine scale it scored an average of 56% of total possible marks, far from shabby. 'Good Sancerre''I feel better already'

Next was Glenkeir Treasures from The Whisky Shop 12/89 - 11/05 15yo 52% 275 bottles. When starting this series the number of distilleries elligible for entry was not particularly high. Glenmorangie, Lagavulin and Glenfarclas were excluded due to lack of independently bottled examples. It was really the Islays that were a happy hunting ground. Beyond these we have Macallan (the next) Springbank then possibly Arran. Rare Malts are getting expensive and I can't imagine selling out a Auchroisk or Banff tasting, the likes of the latter also being necessarily high in ticket price due to the age of stock. Ah well I can but dream of completing the list...
So I thought finding 4 non-official SBs wouldn't be difficult. But having added this tasting to the program only reecently finding the drams proved a challenge in the time, especially as I was busy so didn't have many opportunities to hunt. Helpful Darren from TWS in the Princes Mall had 3 of the company's bottlings to chose from and it was thought this particular single cask would suit.
An acetone belt was pretty much all that greeted the nostrils, a most peculiar SB. On the palate the acetone was pervasive with some sweetness complimenting the chemistry class memories. Don't get me wrong I like the smell of nail polish/peardrops but look for more on the palate when having a malt. Several Cadenheads Lammerlaws have at least the same degree of this unusual contribution. This is fine if you're a fan but not something most of us would have more than one glass a night. I think the 3 bottlings from TWS are the same vintage and quite likely to be from the same batch. It would be intersting to see if the others share the trait. This was a popular guess as the ringer. 43% was the nights lowest score. 'Julio Gallo'. The first two were certainly extensions to my experience of the distillery.

Next was the distiller's own effort. 10yo 100 proof (57%) Straight away the nose had the familiar beefy nose and promise of fuller palate and briny leather that is to be expected. Audible pleasure indicated the room had found what they had come for.
When I first worked with whisky it was behind the bar at The Scotch Malt Whsiky Society. During my time there we rarely had Springbank but its reputation soon became known to me. Being frequently asked for it my curiosity was stimulated as I had yet to taste this revered malt. When I eventually got a taste I wondered what the fuss was about. However I think its fair to say that the likes of the 21yo made such an impression that the distillery became known as one of the true greats and less dramatic bottlings would do well to walk in the shadow of the lofty heights of the likes of the 1966s. Over time I've discovered the ever shifting creature that is SB to most often please and tease with its kaleidoscopic complexity. But a bit like the 60s themselves I wish I was there when things were really going off even if rose-tinted spectacles give the illusion of a never ending summer of contentment. But with this dram former glories are revisited. Perhaps there has been a shift in taste but the characterful embodiment of the company philosophy is tangible through the texture, finish and flavour development. Without water there is so much accesible that more than half the dram is gone before Mr Sensible says 'you're meant to add water' so you do and the party just changes gear. The finish sweeter and not so heavy. An aspect about the 'standardised' bottlings from SB is their uniqueness from batch to batch. A tip. The 'rotation' numbers on the six packs these bottles come in can be used to identify batches that will be the same. So if you find one to your liking then when next purchasing try and see if the carton is the same to avoid buying from a differnt bottling run. It all makes so much sense now. I find writing tasting notes often challenging, if I have talents this is not where they lie. So I'll just limit it to a mix of sensations and levels of taste/aroma coming and going through sweetness, tobacco, sea air, leather all lingering and unwinding at a nice slow pace. A very respectable 74% 'don't add water' 'rough and ready, but I like it' 'decent Cab Sav'

Next Lombard 1991 - 2003 58.5% For me the first evidence of peat of the night, although others picked it up on the 100 proof. The nose is also winey suggesting youth and a strangely sweet sea breeze helps the west coast/island undertones. We've had this bottle in the shop since it was bottled but its high price seems to have damped sales. Having tasted it only twice before, 4 and 5 years ago, I must admit my memory was of a bit of a let down however now things seem to suit my developing tastes more or could it be that old nutmeg- bottle aging? Is 6 years long enough to make a tangible difference? There did seem to be a lower than expected level in the bottles so perhaps a degree of oxidisation had taken place. At 54% of votes the reception was fair but not particularly enthusiastic. Infact all results were of a narrow distribution with there only being two zeros and one 9-out-of-9 scored all night. This is an unusual pattern sugesting solidity with Glenkeir and Lombard having an even spread of favour and the others an increasing growth of appreciation.
With water again new shoe leather and peat turning sweet appear. Maybe sales will pick up...
'pre-dinner, lovely' 'nitromorse and peardrops' 'quirky, flawed but interesting' 'more what I think Springbank is like' 'punchy Rioja'.

Second last Cadenheads 'Number 3 Bond' aka '1842', 55.8%. This is from casks held in the Cadenhead's shops which are filled into various bottle shapes as require. The choice is Lowland, Islay, Campbeltown and Highland. These are vatted malts. The constitunents of the Campbeltown are a bit easier to guess than the Highland. When trying to find a red herring I had to give up as in the limited time I had I didn't find something suitably similar. some said Highland Park others Clynelish. I was more convinced by Glen Scotia, sherried Bunnahabhain ot even Jura. In the event I double-crossed everybody and used 6 Springbanks. This bottling normally contains some Glen Scotia but I intercepted a pure Springbank on its way to fill up the in-store cask. Very much like the official 10yo this example was that little bit hotter, politely asking for a wee dash. Perhaps more sweetness and less leahter and body. This was from a dunnage warehouse so I was told to expect maturation beyond its actual years. This was narrowly the night's winner on 75% but shared so many of the official version's personality they were, to an extent, interchangable, certainly from the same mother and father. 'Vanilla. light, clean' 'Pinot Noir'

Finally- Speciality Drinks Ltd (The Whisky Exchange', 26.11.93 - 16.3.7 13yo 58.7% refill sherry 563 bottles. Sorry no sample left to taste now and memory a bit foggy from last night but a return to the winey characteristics of the Glenkeir. 'St Emilion'
A resounding 70%. Like the official bottling there were no scores below 4 out of 9. This is quite unusual as normally there will be a couple of voters taking exception to the bigger pattern.
Verdict. Variety is the spice of life. This is not a conveyor belt distillery. This means you might be taking a bit of a chance with independents. This is not news. A tasting of different batches of the 100 proof would be good...hold on my wife and my liver are requesting an extraordinary general meeting.

ext tasting 25th June, Islay drams No.2. Pretty much sold out.

cheers

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#30748 - 23/06/09 09:46 AM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: Jolly Toper]
butephoto Offline
Full Member


Registered: 14/02/08
Posts: 106
Loc: Glasgow, Scotland
 Originally Posted By: Jolly Toper
Indeed the Spinnaker was a way out 'left field' as some say.


That's the polite way of saying 'bogging'.
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