Bladnoch Forum
Page 26 of 82 « First<2425262728>Last »
Topic Options
#32717 - 07/11/09 01:06 AM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: Livvy]
Jolly Toper Offline
Full Member


Registered: 18/01/08
Posts: 553
Loc: East Calder, West Lothian, Sco...
With a backdrop of fireworks kindly supplied by Edinburgh Cooncil our Guy Fawkes night tasting got off to a bang. However the first dram was much subtler than an explosion of light and sound and certainly no sulphur. At 35yo and an impressive, for it's age, 55.5% our single cask of grain from the Moffat complex (strangely miles from Moffat being in Airdire) was, as we've come to expect from ancient grains, a delicate affair. With plenty of vanilla, coconut and bananas most of us (there were 19 on the night) had no difficulty drinking this fine example. However scoring was not as high as we've seen for the catagory. Perhaps the heat, almost sting, of the high strength masked the softer notes. But this is really fussy complaints. On the whole we got what I think we were looking for. This particular bottling was chosen as for me this must be one of the rarest singles out there. In an industry overly familiar with hyperbole words like 'rare', 'special' and 'exceptional' have had their meanings over diluted. So when pouring a dram knowing perhaps only a thousand bottles have ever made it to the shelves puts marketing bull into perspective. On a persoanl note I am able to claim I've tasted something from every Scottish distillery from the last 50 years (Malt Mill excluded, but I think that closed 1959ish). But despite owning a recent bottling of Garnheath by Clan Denny I'd not tasted this still's product before a sample of this was tried at Wood Winters' Edinburgh shop preparing for the tasting. Sorry if this sounds like bragging but its not every day you taste a new whisky. I understand Douglas Laing were the source of this edition, bottled under an anonymous labelling for the shop. Very curious that such an ellusive drop should be released without provenance stated. The 50cl bottle size price equated to roughly £100 for standard 70cl. I believe the price rose as stocks depleted. For me it was a bargain. At 67% this was a better than good result although satisfaction wasn't unlimited: 224556677788888. 'Impressive started', 'harsh finish'(he still gave it 7 out of 9)'a good old fashioned sweet shop', 'Morissey, not the Smiths', 'strange', 'creme brulee'. Incidently the complex was the home to the Glenflagler and Killyloch malts. At RMW's Whisky Fringe my half time orange was a 40yo blend which turned out to be made up of the 3 whiskies from the plant. I have yet to find out if they were the only components. Any body know? Married at birth rings a bell too. Thanks to Douglas for the heads up.

Next was the mystery dram. Swapped for a cask strength Islay with my father-in-law who got it for doing some roofing this 1980s blend, Royal Stewart 12yo 40%, was a bit 'left field'. The peculiar nose reminded me of the 1960s Haig bottling we tried some time ago as well as the Michel Couvrer bere barley bottling. I guess this is old fashioned sherry casking at work. However a bitter streak smacks of a bit of a thwack from the caramel stick. Like the other two drasm this one proved strangely compulsive for me. Others were not so courted: a poor 34%- 111122233445566. Note the spread of opinion, quite a unique divergence of aproval. The presentation of the bottle desrves special mention. After last tasting's time travel back to the days of Brut and Hi Karate with the velvelty Antiquary 21yo this heavy, chunky bottle in a similar cut diamond effect shape was completed with a nice bit of tartan on the closure. It was nick named Rod Stewart for its gaudyness. Bottled as a deluxe version of Stewarts Cream of the Barley it prompted a comment 'aye, you can't polish a turd'. 'Smells like cold black coffee', 'Rod Stewart- Baby Jane- 1980s', 'thin palate dissappointing after a subtley spicey sherried nose', 'Wiley coyote- tries hard but falls short', 'baffled', 'like H.P.', 'cold coffee from starbucks', 'apart from nose, like dung, nice whisky'.

The remaining drams were all recently released by Cadenheads. First was a 20yo 1989 Rosebank from a Bourbon hogshead containg 269 bottles at 52.1%. A gentle nose of compulsive organics doesn't prepare for the bold honey sweetness. The flavour lingers and develops. The finish continues and rolls around. This is an essay in structure. A wonderful example of just how complete the taste experience can be. From sip to sip more character emerges and unfolds. From a distillation date common to a number of independent bottlers this is the latest in a long line from this parcel. When I joined Cadenheads in 1999 we had just released a 9yo from this batch. In fact Binny's in Chicago rcently dropped the price of the 9yo to clear!? If more Rosebank behaved like this I'd be more indecisive about my favourite Lowland. An earleir Cadenheads 16yo was note worthy too but didn't have the poise of this example. 256677777788888 a solid 75%. 'A whisky for everybody', 'Elvis before Vegas', 'aye it's good but Bladnoch is better' (seconded), 'nice citrus/honey, peppery finish', 'midsummer's night dream', 'my first love so I suppose Debbie Harry on a sheep skin rug with a lemon'. to think the stills were to be reborn but ended up a victim of copper thiefs, anybody know if the deal to buy them is dead in the water?

Next up was 1992-06/09 Royal Brackla 16yo Bourbon barrel 183 bottles 54.7%. Again coming from a fine run of casks their small size seems to be excerting a complimentary influence. Hopefully there is more to come and the well defined lines are honed to a sleeker still pleasure. Marzipan is amongst the many joys on the nose with a long buttery character emerging after a not unwelcome nod at the sweetie shop's pear drops. (Pear drops sounds so much more enticing than acetone). A pleasing feeling of false age permeats the mid palate, again the cask size and perhaps youth exercising influence, the Rosebank displayed no such signs of time. Again a long lingering finish underscores the quality. Interestingly Jim Murray tasted the Rosie and RB back to back too and shared our enthusiasm. A mighty 82% ranks this as one of the few drams to score over 80. 3566777777888889. Are these rogue casks? Royal Brackla is hardly a dram that is ubiquitous so I've a very poor picture of standard form. Can anybody draw from significant experience and conclude if the distillery is a consistant performer? A question that leads to other comparisons. For me Glen Lossie, Inchgower and Ben Rinnes are other unsung heroes. I also enjoy Ben Nevis, Tobermory and Macduff but can't tell if this is my luck or quality product. The first two of the second list are more common so less of a nystery. Answers on an e-mail to Swapshop 01 811 8055. 'Very complete whisky', 'Buddy Holly before plane crash', 'a Rolls Royce of a malt', 'emminently drinkable', 'impressive', 'very lively: Denisse Van Outen on a spacehopper', 'malt, salt, forrest- gorgeous'.

Next was one of the new Duthies range. Cadenheads have stopped the single cask Original Collection 46% range replacing it with bottlings at the same pre-diluted strength but not necessarily from single casks. The idea is to provide something that won't run out so quickly. Here we have a Clynelish 14yo from sherry wood. From the 2nd batch of Duthies myself and my new colleague Neil both singled this one out as the best. However a more than respectable 70% didn't completely reflect our particular pleasure. 345666677777788. The scoring was good but a few felt the character was a bit too unique and powerful for their tastes. Like Caol Ila and Mortlach Clynelish is a distillery that I have yet to experience a bad example. Perhaps my tolerance is wide compared to others or maybe my luck is better. Whatever we return to the intensity of the Royal Stewart with this nose of sherry and flat caramel (these bottlings contain no artificial colour). A long taste doesn't have the spectrum of flavours the last two drams offered but the insistance of style is refreshingly confident in it's single mindedness. A benefit of this multiple cask bottling style is the number of people that can buy the same bottle, we'll have this for some time whereas the Royal Brackla is now sold out. The weighty fruit really is marvellous. In case you haven't guessed I have taken to writing up these tastings with a set of samples reserved from the night before. As a result you can perhaps detect a slow relaxation in the manner of comment and I notice a greater need to correct my misspelt typing. 'The palate is surprisingly better than the nose', 'Robert Smith of the Cure', 'salty biscuits', 'whisky versus dry Martinin', 'like a bucket of mackerel', 'just shaded by Denisse Van Outen'

Final dram is Laphroaig 1998 - 09/2009 11yo 61.3% Bourbon hogshead 248 bottles. For me Caol Ila and Lagavulin never fail to deliver but examples like this keep my mind open. The sweet smokey medicinal notes come together in a perfectly harmonious ensemble of island and distillery. Maybe my tongue is turning into leather but the cask stength drams tonight have all been particularly clear at full strength, Water needs to be adminsitered cautiously. The nip with the Laphroaig however is particularly evident and water really brings out the salt n' vinegar crisps on the sea front with a strong easterly in your face. The texture turns less biting with a few drops but the persistance of the hallmark character remains if slightly mellowed. 85% steals the show. 66677888888999. Once again the peat heads have their day but the voting for once seems to reflect a concensus which is most unusual for Islay. 'wham- no further comment', 'Scott Walker, everything', 'peat monster', 'I'm a glutten for peat', 'Keith Moon- meaty, beaty, big and bouncy'.

Next tasting 19th Nov. World Whiskies No.2, details to follow.

Top
#32718 - 07/11/09 08:59 AM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: Jolly Toper]
Jolly Toper Offline
Full Member


Registered: 18/01/08
Posts: 553
Loc: East Calder, West Lothian, Sco...
November 19th World whiskies No.2
Plenty to choose from at the moment but probably-

Peated Bakery Hill 60% from Australia

Ginko blended malt 46% from Japan

DYC Spanish blend 8yo 40%

Malted oat 42% from Austria

Stranahans single malt batch 34 47% from Colorado

St. George's single malt 1st fill Bourbon cask 25.10.07 - 27.8.9 46%

+ amystery dram

Top
#32719 - 07/11/09 09:23 AM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: Jolly Toper]
Leither Offline
Full Member


Registered: 19/10/06
Posts: 285
Loc: Edinburgh
Great tasting Mark, it's been a while for me but it was definitely 'back with a bang' on Guy Fawkes night for this one.

All the drams, except from the Royal 'Rod' Stewart, were extremely good indeed.

I won't be able to get 'Debbie Harry on a sheepskin rug' out of my head all weekend. 'With a lemon' too ;\)

Talking of which, I once went to bed with a woman that looked like Debbie Harry, but when I woke up she looked more like Harry Debbie (aye, the old ones are the best!).
_________________________
Today's rain is tomorrow's whisky

Top
#32722 - 07/11/09 08:49 PM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: Leither]
Jolly Toper Offline
Full Member


Registered: 18/01/08
Posts: 553
Loc: East Calder, West Lothian, Sco...
I hope I still have the (empty) can of Tennents Debbie Harry drank from at a gig I was at. On the same night I literally bumped into Steven Tyler from Aerosmith. I asked him if he was for a tipple. He asked for a 'Club Soda', I had no idea what such a thing was and when I discovered it was non alcoholic I thought I might be encouraging irresponsible drinking if I got him one so declined. Turns out he was a recovering alcoholic. D'oh
Top
#32726 - 08/11/09 10:08 AM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: Jolly Toper]
Livvy Offline
Full Member


Registered: 21/03/03
Posts: 1974
Loc: Cupar
Brilliant!!
Top
#32844 - 21/11/09 02:00 AM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: Livvy]
Jolly Toper Offline
Full Member


Registered: 18/01/08
Posts: 553
Loc: East Calder, West Lothian, Sco...
Last night we cast the net wide to take in four corners of the globe, my mathematical training indicates a sphere has no points but you know what I mean. The theme was 'world whiskies'. This doesn't mean we normally use pan-galactic types (although Mortlach sounds like something a Klingon maight mutter) just that there is not a phrase to describe whiskies outwith the normal homes of distilling. Whatever, it was another excuse to have some drams. I was particularly pleased with the turn-out, 20 attending and two 'take aways'. This showed a sense of adventure very satisfying to discover while I often find whiskies outwith Scotland receive scoffs, usually from people who have never tried them.

Our opener was DYC (Distillerias Y Crianza) from Segovia in Spain. By the way you might find some of the information I relay to be a bit shaky. This is because tracking down facts proved a bit of a challenge. My main sources were the excellent publications: World Whisky from Dorling Kindersley, their similar title Whisky and Malt Whisky Yearbook. I never got to the individual company's websites which would undoubtably rewarded my efforts. Ho hum, not enough hours in the day. A sketch of the distillery shows this is the earliest foundation from the night's selection with the project commencing in 1959 and production starting in 1962/63. The site seems to have it all with malting being practiced and bottling only relatively recently being shifted to an off-site location. Both grain and malt are produced but blending accounting for virtually all expressions. A pure malt has recently (2007) come on stream to compliment the standard and 8yo blends. Being ownde by Beam Global its a fair assumption Laphroaig and Ardmore are includeed. Vodka and rum are both also produced. The production level is not modest at 8 and 2 MLPA split grain/malt respectively. Being the 3rd best selling brand in Spain is quite significant as the country has a fair thirst for 'Quiski'.
Our sample, 8yo 40%, was brought back by a kind customer and exchange for £20 worth of malt. Apparently containing fresh grain to a fair component this is not a problem as a slight smokey element makes sure its not all about keeping costs down. A sweetish finish carries some caramel leaving a good impression although little drama is to be found: 1122222222333444456 and 32% shows a spread of appreciation anchored around a willingness to drink more but only if free. 'I'd drink it in Spain', 'thin, grainy, no nose, palate ok', 'sharp but dull, a bit young', 'perfect for a cold as the nose is the worst thing', 'Paranormal Activity- surprising indie flick, not overwhelming'. 'nice but bland, drinkable'.

Oh well. Lets try- a very rare example of a vatted malt from different Japanese distilleries owned by competing companies. Bottled by Ichiro, the man behind Hanyu's rebirth and the playing card series. No age statement 46% typically low £50, this one supplied by Dufftown Whisky Shop, thanks Mike. A proper nose delivers it's promise of medium bodied relatively rich barley and oaty biscuits. A nice oily texture showing absence of heavy filtering. Proper bottling then. Not knowing the components the assumption is there will be quite a mix of styles and the result demonstrates skillful blending afoot. For me this is one of those drams which I wished I had more of, tasting this glass leaves me with the feeling I'll never try it again which is a pity as I think if one had a whole bottle to get to know it would give up its secrets more willingly after closer scrutiny. Marzipan comes out as the finish lingers and develops. 2233444555555566677 and 52% reflects much more confidence from the intrepid explorers. 'odd smell, sweet', 'The Ring; excitement but it creeps me out', 'chocolate', 'very well made, a Lexus of a whisky', 'no bad', 'nice but nothing remarkable', 'it has some body and is not too nasty', 'a bland nip (Freud!?) with a bit of chocolate', 'nice', 'very sweet'.

Next was a late entry from Saint George's Distillery, the one in Norfolk not San Francisco. With the coming of age yet to be, 12/12/09 for that (there is talk of a 2000ish botttle release coming in time for Jesus's birthday celebrations), the example was just under 2 years and released alongside a similarly aged peated expression (no ppm stated) and peated (50ppm) and unpeated new make. For me the aged peated was not as good as the new make but the aged unpeated had the edge on the new make. First fill Bourbon wood. It is my understanding a bottling line means this has been sympatheticaly cut to 46% using the same production water but I'm not 100%. This father and son outfit was the first English distillery for a hundred years and upset some Scots with a over keen sense of National pride and mean-ness (think McGlashan form Absolutely- google it if you're curious). They should be particularly concerned as my experiences to date have been very positive. Although they perhaps can take solice/further incredulity in the fact it was a very Scottish Iain Henderson, ex-Laphroaig and other stills manager, who captained the maiden voyages. No filtering or artificial colouring contributes to the growing wind of change note worthy in the malt industry (Deanston 12yo, etc). Dunnage warehousing adds to the careful attention to practice and experiments in triple distillation further intrigues. However stainless steel wash backs and a semi-lauter mash tun hint at modern approach to efficiency and maintenance. A 2800 litre wash still and a 1800 litre spirit still explains the modest output of roughly 150 000 bottles per annum. My first try was thanks to Helen at the Bow Bar and in my advanced state of fuzziness I was impressed by the tasty and comfortable style. This example doesn't disappoint either with oodles of sweetness and enough youth to retain a luscious juicyness which will surely be exchanged for a more sensible and normal blossoming cask influence soon. Shame as I feel the softened new-make frfeshness is so appealing. I really look forward to trying this as the years pass to see how time will mould the spirit. With this example I can't help but feel the 3 year minimum is a line drawn in the sand which doesn't take into account the fine results of good spirit in good casks, sure we need to have standards and I don'r know how better to restrict immaturity from ruining the reputation of whisky at large but time is an abstract to barrels and spirit, sorry to repeat myself but we're not putting something in the microwave for 5 minutes, its just not that precise. I'd welcome somebody bottling something that would seriously worry the white spirit producers. I can't believe whisky companies are chasing vodka drinkers with J&B -6 etc when all they need to do is bottle good new/under 3yo spirit at low strength to counter the pricing issue and flavour intensity. Rant over. A quick look at the scores on the doors from last night indicates I should not be given a budget to float this spruce goose: (-1)000001111122445667 You'll notice the scale starting at zero was not sufficient for one individual's reaction, he felt the need to add a sub-level to reflect his displeasure in an almost Spinal Tap moment of exageration. 'I'd wait for it's older sibling', 'nasty' ,'antidote to swine flu', 'don't drink- good for stag weekend fines' 'bad grappa, then again all grapa is bad', 'tastes of nothing', 'sweet, strong, young', 'Blair Witch Project, its a project', 'very different, not a whisky for a whisky virgin'.

Next, off to Colorado with their first distillery since ever. Stranahan's has only been about since 2003/04 but the reaction to the single malt matured in fresh heavy charred US white oak (6 figure bottle sales long past) has warranted moving to a larger site. Now the home of an out of business brewery so production can be controlled starting at brewing rather than getting a brewer to supply the first stage. I'm no expert but a 6 day fermentation needs more investigation. I believe some rum producers go for this length when trying to produce unique esters. Anybody out there got the answer? A minimum of 2 years in the cask and a back catalogue of 5/6 years of stock enables batches to have a varied spectrum of style for the blender's palate. Apparently the fashion for finishing has promoted some experimentation so hopefully Royal Mile Whiskies will be a source of such essays as they seem to have cornered the UK import for the (rather pricey) brand. This bottle is the second we've tested and is courtesy of a fine example of a customer, he was so pleased with the 30yo Convalmore I 'let him buy' he sent me some of his local brew, a gentleman, others take note. A Vendome still for the mash, I think this is a kind of cylindrical column on a pot rectifying type job, at 2800l is paired with a typically teeny micro 950 litre spirit still. Sweet with fresh/new finish and a curious, almost European fruitiness straying towards schnapps but countered by the oak: 47%abv, 1112344455566777788: 53%, 'banana milkshake', 'Texas Chainsaw Massacre, enjoyable but not really high quality', 'sweet, grass', 'shame about the finish, reflux of burnt scrapped toast', 'selection box of toxic flavours', 'great on the nose', 'very nice, cloves, complex, sweet'. This bottle won the packaging award with a solid, frontier look and feel, top marks.

Penultimate is back to Europe and Austria. I'd heard of someone there making whisky from oats and my quest was resolved when a customer equally on a mission, to find an old 20yo Cadenheads Glen Moray got in touch. I heard the Irish used oats in their whisky and also noticed in Fine Expression's reprinting of The Manufacture of Whisky and Plain Spirit, 1913, that this was used also in Scotland at the time of writing. However I was not prepared for the results. Again a Schnapps like fruitiness was quite at odds with whisky at large, and rightly so. This is Austrian whisky not copy cat 'Scotch', bravo. Again advice please, the linguists amongst us were unsure but they concluded what we were drinking wass 100% malted oats rather than a mix of malted (or unmalted) oats with matled barley. I was also sent spelt whisky, a la Edu en France. I feel another World Whisky tasting coming on but wonder if anybody will return. The more I taste the more I like. 42%abv. An 19th century fruit liqueur distillery which turned its hand to whisky in 1998. 000011122244444557: 28%. 'something different, a dram for discussion', 'drink with dark chocolate', 'ok but not a malt', 'hideous', 'its inoffensive, like Switzerland', 'leather, the bottle was really ugly', 'Frankenstein, an interesting experiment but ugly', 'really nice and unusual'.

Finally off to Oz. Bakery Hill peated single malt 60% barrel 6009. From Victoria, the south east section of Australia, has been producing since 2000. They issue only single casks at 60% or diluted. Our bottle was, again, kindly brought to us by a whisky friend, Nick. Again not cheap, 50cl bottle costing £50. Apparently only available from the distillery. Looking for an importer Mr Baker? Like Stranahan's brewing is now controlled on site whereas originally this was out-sourced. Artificial colouring is thankfully avoided as is chill filtering. Traditional double distilling in a single copper pot is practiced with peated malt travelling from the UK. I can't help but think of McArthy's, especially on the nose. This is a good thing. Ex Jack Daniels casks are favoured. I must admit having been on the lap top for 2 hours and tasted some exciting drams this Bakery Hill is coming across as a fitting finale. Superb. All you want from a wood fired barbie, peat makes little impression, its all about wood/folliage smoke. The sweet and fruity angle presumably from Tennesee compliments the mid palate and the 60% seems appropriate. 2344556667788888888: 70% this is high calibre whisky. The finish is long lasting and unveils both tropical and high note fruits whilst the fuller smoky bass line keeps twanging. 'nice peaty but not too peaty, but not as good as the Austrian oats', 'Evil Dead II, awesome though cliched', 'Elle McPherson: Beautiful Austrailian', '6/9 but I don't like it this peaty', 'the best of them all', 'most interesting', 'red whisky'

The next tasting is the 3rd of December and is sold out- Cambus, Longrow, 2 Highland Parks, Ballantines and a mystery dram. Mmmmm Bakery Hill peated. G'night.

Top
#32846 - 21/11/09 09:12 AM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: Jolly Toper]
Livvy Offline
Full Member


Registered: 21/03/03
Posts: 1974
Loc: Cupar
I am looking forward to the blind tasting on the 17th...we have John Glaser from Compass Box visiting our society on the 3rd..so my emotions would have been split had I stumped for a ticket on the 3rd. Then back in Auld Reekie on the 5th for a Joe Bonamassa gig...today it is Murrayfield to see the Aussies get spanked by the boys in blue!!
Top
#32857 - 21/11/09 06:18 PM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: Livvy]
Åke Johansson Offline
Full Member


Registered: 16/07/02
Posts: 2136
Loc: Hammarö, Sweden
Detilerias y Crianza was involved in the sad history of the Lochside Distillery:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lochside_Distillery
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Destiler%C3%ADas_y_Crianza_del_Whisky_S.A.


http://www.blogcatalog.com/blog/whisky-for-everyone/c16cdceaaa68fb5dac24cf205dc61d53



Åke

Top
#32895 - 23/11/09 09:36 PM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: Åke Johansson]
Jolly Toper Offline
Full Member


Registered: 18/01/08
Posts: 553
Loc: East Calder, West Lothian, Sco...
Since the two December tastings are over subscribed a new date will be squeezed in:

7.30 Thursday 10th December Tollbooth Tavern 167 Canongate, Royal Mile, Edinburgh. £20/17*

Cadenheads Royal Brackla 1976 - 11/06 30yo 53.8% sherry hogshead 126 bottles

Springbank 06/97 - 01/09 11yo Madeira wood 55.1% 2090 bottles (Loch Fyne Whiskies whisky of the year)

Cadenheads Ardbeg 1994 - 06/09 15yo Bourbon hogshead 284 bottles 58.1%

something unusual

something rare

+ a mystery dram

Top
#32944 - 25/11/09 10:03 PM Re: Edinburgh/Canongate Regular Tastings [Re: Jolly Toper]
Jolly Toper Offline
Full Member


Registered: 18/01/08
Posts: 553
Loc: East Calder, West Lothian, Sco...
The other two drams will be:-

Campbeltown Loch 30yo (2009 release)

Cadenheads Dumbarton distillery (Inverleven stills) 1987 - 05/06 18yo 57.9% Bourbon hogshead 276 bottles

Top
Page 26 of 82 « First<2425262728>Last »


Moderator:  Raymond 
Hop to:
Who's Online
0 registered and 18 anonymous users online.
July
Su M Tu W Th F Sa
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31
Newest Members
Nadadaday, Paulie77, flower1209, killerki, FelixDeSax
3836 Registered Users
Top Posters
5616
Raymond
4085
autism
2494
Alexander
2231
Par
2136
Åke Johansson

Generated in 0.025 seconds in which 0.013 seconds were spent on a total of 14 queries. Zlib compression disabled.

© Bladnoch Forum - Site design & maintenance by kirkmoor.com